Section 112 of Income Tax Act : Capital Gain on Long Term Capital Assets

Any income or loss arising on the sale of a capital asset is a capital gain. Based on the nature of the capital asset and the nature of the capital gain, the income tax department has defined the provisions for capital gains tax. Capital Gain arising on the sale of a long term capital asset is a Long Term Capital Gain. As per the Income Tax Act, provisions for tax on Long Term Capital Gains are covered under Section 112 and Section 112A. Section 112 of Income Tax Act is the provision for taxation of capital gains on long term capital assets other than those covered under Section 112A of Income Tax Act.

What is Section 112 of Income Tax Act?

Section 112 is the income tax provision for tax on long term capital assets. It applies to all taxpayers such as individual, HUF, partnership firm, company, resident, non-resident, foreign company, etc. This section covers capital gains arising from the sale of all long-term capital assets. Long Term Capital Asset covers the following assets:

  • Securities (other than unit) listed on a recognised stock exchange in India
  • Unit of the unit trust of India
  • zero-coupon bond
  • Securities not listed on a recognised stock exchange in India
  • Immovable property being land or building or both
  • Any other capital asset

Section 112 does not apply to the capital gains on the sale of the following long-term capital assets to which Section 112A applies:

  • Listed equity shares where STT is paid on acquisition or transfer 
  • Units of equity-oriented mutual funds where STT is paid on transfer 
  • Units of business trust where STT is paid on transfer

Income Tax on LTCG under Section 112 of Income Tax Act

The income tax rate applicable to different capital assets is based on the nature of the asset and the period of holding. Below are the applicable tax rates for LTCG under Section 112.

Asset Type Period of Holding Tax Rate on LTCG
Listed Securities (other than unit) 12 months Lower of 10% without indexation or 20% with indexation
Zero-Coupon Bonds 12 months Lower of 10% without indexation or 20% with indexation
Unit of Unit Trust of India 12 months 20% with indexation
Unlisted Securities 24 months 20%
Immovable Property 24 months 20% with indexation
Any other asset 36 months 20%

Adjustment of LTCG u/s 112 against Basic Exemption Limit

Taxpayers holding the status of Resident as per the rules to determine the residential status can take benefit of adjusting the special rate income against the basic exemption limit to reduce taxes. Thus, if your total taxable income is less than the basic exemption limit, you can adjust your special rate income such as LTCG u/s 112, STCG u/s 111ALTCG u/s 112A, etc. against the shortfall in the basic exemption limit and pay tax on the remaining income only.

LTCG u/s 112 – Reporting in Schedule CG of ITR

The ITR Form under which the taxpayer needs to report income from capital gains includes ITR-2 and ITR-3. The taxpayer must report the following details for LTCG under Schedule CG of the ITR:

  • Full value of consideration i.e. sales value
  • Deductions under Section 48
    • Indexed Cost of acquisition i.e. purchase value
    • Indexed Cost of improvement
    • Expenditure wholly and exclusively in connection with transfer i.e. transfer expenses
  • LTCG is automatically computed

Set Off & Carry Forward LTCL under Section 112 of Income Tax Act

The loss on sale of a capital asset as per Section 112 held for more than the period of holding is a Long Term Capital Loss. A taxpayer can set off LTCL from one capital asset against LTCG from another capital asset. As per the income tax rules for set off and carry forward of losses, the taxpayer can set off LTCL i.e. Long Term Capital Loss against Long Term Capital Gains only in the current year. The taxpayer can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against future LTCG only.

Exemption from LTCG Tax under Section 112

The taxpayer having long term capital gain income from the sale of a specified asset under Section 112 such as listed securities on which STT is not paid, zero-coupon bonds, immovable property, unlisted securities, etc can claim the following capital gain exemptions:

  • Section 54EE – Exemption on sale of any long-term capital asset on investment in units of a specified fund.
  • Section 54F – Exemption on sale of any long-term capital asset (except house) on investment in residential house property.
  • The taxpayer can claim Capital Gain Exemption on the sale of immovable property under Section 54, Section 54EC, Section 54EE, Section 54GB depending upon the nature of the capital asset

A taxpayer can claim the exemption by reinvesting the proceeds from the sale into a specified capital asset. Such exemption would lower the capital gains and save taxes on the same. However, the taxpayer must hold the new asset for the specified period as per the relevant section. However, if he/she sells the asset before the specified time period, he/she must report it as an income in the relevant financial year and pay tax at the applicable rate.

The taxpayer has an option to open an account under the Capital Gains Account Scheme and park the sale proceeds in it till the time they invest in the specified asset to claim the Capital Gains exemption.

Section 112 v/s 112A v/s 111A

  • Section 112 of Income Tax Act applies to all long term capital assets defined under Section 2(29AA) of the Income Tax Act. Different tax rates are defined for long term capital gains on these assets except the ones covered under Section 112A.
  • Section 112A of Income Tax Act is the overriding section of Section 112. Thus, it applies to long term capital gains on sale of specified long term capital assets i.e. equity shares, equity mutual funds, and units of business trust on which STT is paid and are listed on a recognised stock exchange in India.
  • Section 111A of Income Tax Act applies to short term capital gains on sale of equity shares, equity mutual funds, and units of business trust on which STT is paid and are listed on a recognised stock exchange in India.

FAQs

What is the difference between Section 112 and Section 112A of the Income Tax Act?

Section 112A is the provision for tax on LTCG on equity shares, equity mutual funds, and units of business trust on which STT is paid and listed on a recognised stock exchange in India. Section 112 is the provision for tax on LTCG for all assets except those covered under Section 112A.
The tax rate under Section 112A is 10% in excess of INR 1 lac. The tax rate under Section 112 is based on the nature of the capital asset.

Can I claim Chapter VI-A deductions from Section 80C to 80U from LTCG u/s 112?

The Income Tax Act does not allow claiming deduction from Section 80C to 80U against LTCG under Section 112. However, the taxpayer can claim Chapter VI-A deductions on capital gains taxable at slab rates.

How can I save capital gain tax on the sale of a long term capital asset?

Capital gain tax on the sale of a long term capital asset under Section 112 can be saved either by claiming exemption from Section 54 to Section 54GB based on the nature of the capital asset. Further, you can save tax by setting off STCL or LTCL on the sale of any other capital asset against such income.

Capital Gain Tax on Movable Property : Jewellery, Car, Painting

Income from the sale of a capital asset is treated as Capital Gains as per Income Tax. Based on the nature of the capital asset and the nature of the capital gain, the income tax department has defined the provisions for capital gains tax. Movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, work of art, etc has a period of holding of 36 months. Capital Gain Tax on movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, etc is taxed at slab rates in case of Short Term Capital Gain i.e. STCG, and at a rate of 20% with the benefit of indexation in case of Long Term Capital Gain i.e. LTCG.

Capital Gains on Sale of Jewellery, Car, Painting, etc

The Income Tax Department has laid out specified sections for taxation of capital assets such as Section 112A for LTCG on equity shares and Section 111A for STCG on equity shares. Let us understand the capital gains on other capital assets and their tax treatment. Other capital assets include the following:

  • Jewellery – ornaments made of gold, silver, platinum, precious stones, etc
  • Drawings & Paintings
  • Archaeological collections
  • Sculptures
  • Work of art
  • Motor Vehicle i.e. car, bus, motorcycle, truck, etc
  • Any other property held by a taxpayer

Any income or loss arising on the sale of any of the above-listed assets is treated as Capital Gains. Section 2(42A) of the Income Tax Act defines a Short Term Capital Asset and Section 2(29A) defines a Long Term Capital Asset. Based on this definition, the period of holding in the case of other capital assets such as jewellery, car, painting, etc is 36 months. Thus, if such capital asset is sold within 36 months of purchase, the profit or loss is STCG and if sold after 36 months, the profit or loss is LTCG.

Income Tax on Sale of Jewellery, Car, Painting, etc

Capital Gains on sale of movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, etc is taxable based on the nature of capital gain. Following is the tax treatment for capital gains on movable property:

Capital Gain
Description
Income Tax Rate
Long-Term Capital Gain Sold after 36 months from purchase 20% with Indexation u/s 112
Short-Term Capital Gain Sold within 36 months from purchase Slab Rates

Short Term Capital Gain on Sale of Movable Property at Slab Rates

If a movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, etc is sold within 36 months from its purchase, the profit or loss is a Short Term Capital Gain or Short Term Capital Loss. STCG on a movable property is not a special rate income and is taxable at slab rates.

Long Term Capital Gain on Sale of Movable Property under Section 112

If a movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, etc is sold after 36 months from its purchase, the profit or loss is a Long Term Capital Gain or Long Term Capital Loss. LTCG on a movable property is a special rate income taxable under Section 112 of the Income Tax Act.

Section 112 of the Income Tax Act is the provision for tax on long term capital gains. A resident individual or HUF is liable to pay tax at the rate of 20% with the benefit of indexation. Thus, long term capital gain tax on the sale of movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, etc is taxable at 20% with indexation.

Example

Mrs X, a resident in India, bought some jewellery in February 2019 for INR 15,00,000. He sold the same in March 2021 for INR 25,00,000. Calculate the tax liability.

To determine the nature of capital gain, the period of holding for jewellery is 36 months. Since Mrs X sold out the jewellery within 36 months of purchase, this will be treated as a short term capital gain. Below is the tax liability:

  Particulars Amount (INR)
  Full value of consideration or Sales consideration 25,00,000
Less Cost of Acquisition 15,00,000
  Short Term Capital Gains 10,00,000
  Tax Liability (slab rates) 1,12,500
Add Health & Education Cess (4%) 4,500
  Total Tax Liability 1,17,000

If in the above example, if she sold the jewellery in March 2022 i.e. after 36 months from purchase, this will be treated as a long term capital gain. Below is the tax liability:

  Particulars Amount (INR)
  Full value of consideration or Sales consideration 25,00,000
Less Indexed Cost of Acquisition (15,00,000 * 317/280) 16,98,214
  Long Term Capital Gains 8,01,786
  Tax Liability (20%) 1,60,357
Add Health & Education Cess (4%) 6,414
  Total Tax Liability 1,66,771

Adjustment of LTCG on movable property against Basic Exemption Limit

Taxpayers holding the status of Resident as per the rules to determine the residential status can take benefit of adjusting the special rate income against the basic exemption limit to reduce taxes. Thus, if your total taxable income is less than the basic exemption limit, you can adjust your special rate income such as LTCG u/s 112, STCG u/s 111A, LTCG u/s 112A, etc. against the shortfall in the basic exemption limit and pay tax on the remaining income only.

In the above example, if Mrs X had only LTCG income and no other income, the calculation of tax liability would be in the following manner:

Since Mrs X is a resident and the basic exemption limit is not utilised, she can take benefit of adjusting the special rate income against the basic exemption limit. Thus, taxable LTCG = 8,01,786 – 2,50,000 = INR 5,51,786. Tax Liability = 5,51,786 * 20% = INR 1,10,357.

Capital Gain Tax on movable property – Reporting under Schedule CG of ITR

The ITR Form under which the taxpayer needs to report income from capital gains includes ITR-2 and ITR-3. Taxpayer must report STCG on other assets under A5 and LTCG on other assets under B9 of Schedule CG of the ITR. The taxpayer must report the following details:

  • Full value of consideration i.e. sales value
  • Deductions under Section 48
    • Cost of acquisition i.e. purchase value (indexed COA for LTCG)
    • Cost of improvement (indexed COI for LTCG)
    • Expenditure wholly and exclusively in connection with transfer i.e. transfer expenses
  • STCG or LTCG is automatically computed

Set Off & Carry Forward STCL under Section 111A of Income Tax Act

The loss on sale of movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, etc can be a Short Term Capital Loss or Long Term Capital Loss. As per the income tax rules for set off and carry forward of losses, STCL i.e. Short Term Capital Loss can be set off against both Short Term Capital Gains and Long Term Capital Gains in the current year. The taxpayer can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against future STCG and LTCG only. Further, Long Term Capital Loss can be set off against Long Term Capital Gains only. The taxpayer can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against future LTCG only.

Exemption from Capital Gain Tax on jewellery, car, painting, etc

The taxpayer having long term capital gain income from the sale of movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, etc can claim the following capital gain exemptions:

  • Section 54EE – Exemption on sale of any long term capital asset on investment in units of a specified fund.
  • Section 54F – Exemption on sale of any long term capital asset (except house) on investment in residential house property.

A taxpayer can claim the exemption by reinvesting the proceeds from the sale into a specified capital asset. Such exemption would lower the capital gains and save taxes on the same. However, the taxpayer must hold the new asset for the specified period as per the relevant section. However, if he/she sells the asset before the specified time period, he/she must report it as an income in the relevant financial year and pay tax at the applicable rate.

The taxpayer has an option to open an account under the Capital Gains Account Scheme and park the sale proceeds in it till the time they invest in the specified asset to claim the Capital Gains exemption.

FAQs

How can I save capital gain tax on the sale of jewellery?

Capital gain tax on movable property such as jewellery, car, painting, etc can be saved. In the case of STCG, the Income Tax Act does not provide any specific exemption. You can save tax by setting off STCL on the sale of any other capital asset against such income. Further, you can claim chapter VI-A deduction from Section 80C to 80U. In the case of LTCG, you can claim a capital gain exemption under Section 54EE or Section 54F of the Income Tax Act.

Do I have to pay income tax on the sale of a car?

Income from the sale of a car is a Capital Gains and is taxable as per income tax. STCG on sale of car within 36 months of purchase is taxable at slab rates. LTCG on sale of car after 36 months of purchase is taxable at 20% with the benefit of indexation as per Section 112.

Can I claim Chapter VI-A deductions from Section 80C to 80U from LTCG u/s 112?

The Income Tax Act does not allow claiming deduction from Section 80C to 80U against LTCG under Section 112. However, the taxpayer can claim Chapter VI-A deductions on capital gains taxable at slab rates.

Short Term Capital Gain Tax on Shares : Section 111A

The income from capital gains is taxable at special rates under Income Tax. Income Tax on Equity Share Trading can be treated as Long Term Capital Gains or Short Term Capital Gains based on the period of holding. Section 111A of Income Tax Act covers provisions for tax on short-term capital gain on the sale of listed equity shares, equity mutual funds, and units of business trust on which STT (Securities Transaction Tax) is paid. Gain or loss from the sale of listed equity shares and other equity instruments held for less than 12 months is a Short Term Capital Gain. Such gain is taxable at 15% (plus surcharge and cess) under Section 111A.

What is Short Term Capital Gain Tax under Section 111A?

The profit or loss on the sale of a capital asset held for less than the specified holding period is a Short Term Capital Gain i.e. STCG or Short Term Capital Loss i.e. STCL. Section 2(42A) of the Income Tax Act defines a Short Term Capital Asset. Based on this definition, the period of holding in the case of listed equity shares and equity mutual funds is 12 months. Thus, if the listed equity share of a domestic company is sold within 12 months of purchase, the profit or loss is Short Term Capital Gain i.e. STCG, or Short Term Capital Loss i.e. STCL.

Section 111A of the Income Tax Act is the provision for taxation of STCG at a rate of 15% on the sale of:

Section 111A covers the following transaction even if STT is not paid on it:

  • STCG on the sale of equity shares, equity mutual funds, or units of business trust listed on a recognised stock exchange in an International Financial Services Centre (IFSC) and if the consideration is paid or payable in foreign currency.

STCG on sale of unlisted shares and securities, debt mutual funds, bonds, debentures, immovable property, motor vehicle, jewellery, etc is taxable at slab rates and not as per special rate u/s 111A.

Income Tax on Short Term Capital Gain under Section 111A

As per Section 111A of Income Tax Act, short term capital gain tax on equity shares and mutual funds is taxable at a special rate of 15%. Cess and Surcharge are additionally applicable.

Example

Mr. A, a resident in India, bought 10,000 equity shares of A Ltd in December 2021 at INR 100 per share. He sold the shares in April 2022 at INR 135 per share through BSE. He paid brokerage of INR 1 per share and STT of INR 1500. Mr. A also has a salary income of INR 8,40,000. What will be the tax liability of Mr. Ashok?

Mr. A sold the equity shares within 12 months and thus its a Short Term Capital Gain. Since it was a listed equity share with STT paid, STCG is taxable at 15% under Section 111A. Let’s calculate the short term capital gain tax on shares.

  Particulars Amount
  Full value of consideration or Sales consideration (10,000 * 135) 13,50,000
Less Transfer Expenses (10,000 * 1) (10,000)
  Net Sale Consideration 13,40,000
Less Cost of Acquisition (10,000 * 100) 10,00,000
  Short Term Capital Gains 3,40,000
  STCG Tax Liability (3,40,000 * 15%) 51,000

Salary Income is taxable at slab rates and tax liability = INR 80,500. Thus total tax liability = 80,500 + 51,000 = INR 1,31,500. Health and Education Cess of 4% is applicable on this tax liability.

Adjustment of STCG u/s 111A against Basic Exemption Limit

Taxpayers holding the status of Resident as per the rules to determine the residential status can take benefit of adjusting the special rate income against the basic exemption limit to reduce taxes. Thus, if your total taxable income is less than the basic exemption limit, you can adjust your special rate income such as STCG u/s 111A, LTCG u/s 112A, etc. against the shortfall in basic exemption limit and pay tax on the remaining income only.

In the above example, if Mr. A had income from capital gains and no salary income, the calculation of tax liability would be in the following manner:

Since Mr. A is a resident and the basic exemption limit is not utilised, he can take benefit of adjusting the special rate income against the basic exemption limit. Thus, taxable STCG = 3,40,000 – 2,50,000 = INR 90,000. Tax Liability = 90,000 * 15% = INR 13,500.

STCG on Shares – Reporting under Schedule CG of ITR

The ITR Form under which the taxpayer needs to report income from capital gains includes ITR-2 and ITR-3. Taxpayer must report income from capital gains in A2 under Schedule CG of the ITR. The taxpayer must report the following details:

  • Full value of consideration i.e. sales value
  • Deductions under Section 48
    • Cost of acquisition i.e. purchase value
    • Expenditure wholly and exclusively in connection with transfer i.e. transfer expenses
  • Short Term Capital Gain i.e. STCG on shares is automatically computed

Set Off & Carry Forward STCL under Section 111A of Income Tax Act

The loss on sale of listed equity shares and mutual funds held for up to 12 months is a Short Term Capital loss. A taxpayer can set off STCL from one capital asset against STCG and LTCG from another capital asset. As per the income tax rules for set off and carry forward of losses, STCL i.e. Short Term Capital Loss can be set off against both Short Term Capital Gains and Long Term Capital Gains in the current year. The taxpayer can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against future STCG and LTCG only.

If the taxpayer has income from the sale of some listed equity shares and securities, and profit from other listed equity shares and securities, only net gains are taxable at 15%. Further, the taxpayer can set off the net STCL under Section 111A of income tax act against STCG and LTCG on the sale of shares, securities, property, jewellery, car or any other capital asset. The taxpayer can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years.

FAQs

I sold equity shares on BSE at a profit of after holding them for 10 months. What is the applicable income tax rate?

If you have sold equity shares after holding them for upto 12 months, it is a Short Term Capital Gain. STCG on shares that are listed on a recognised stock exchange and on which the investor pays STT are taxable at 15% under Section 111A. Your Taxable STCG = Sell Value – Buy Value. Income Tax on STCG = 15% of Taxable STCG.

How can I save STCG on shares?

The Income Tax Act does not provide any specific exemption for STCG on sale of listed equity shares & equity mutual funds. However, here are some ways of saving STCG tax on shares:
1. STCL i.e. Short Term Capital Loss on sale of any capital asset can be adjusted against STCG from sale of equity shares and equity mutual funds
2. If you’re a resident in India and other taxable incomes are less than INR 2.5 lacs, you can adjust the STCG against basic exemption limit and pay tax at 15% on the remaining amount only.

Can I claim Chapter VI-A deductions from Section 80C to 80U from STCG u/s 111A?

The Income Tax Act does not allow claiming deduction from Section 80C to 80U against STCG taxable under Section 111A. However, the taxpayer can claim Chapter VI-A deductions on STCG other than those taxable under Section 111A.

Tax on IPO : Initial Public Offering

What is an IPO?

An initial public offering (IPO) refers to the process of offering shares of a private company to the public in a new stock issuance. IPOs allow a company to raise capital from public investors. The transition from a private to a public company can be an important time for private investors to fully realize gains from their investment as it typically includes share premiums for current private investors. Meanwhile, it also allows public investors to participate in the offering. A company goes public to raise funds for its growth and expansion and create public awareness about its products and services. The investors must understand the provisions for income tax on IPO.

An investor can apply for an IPO. On the day of listing of the company on the recognised stock exchange, the company initiates IPO allotment. If the investor receives shares under the IPO allotment, income tax would not be applicable. However, when the investor sells these shares, the tax treatment is the same as tax on sale of listed equity shares. Income on the sale of shares received under IPO allotment is treated as Capital Gains. Let us understand the tax treatment in detail.

Tax on IPO

Calculation of Capital Gain Tax on IPO Listing

Income on the sale of securities is treated as Capital Gains under Income Tax. The type of capital gain whether LTCG or STCG and the applicable tax rate depends upon the nature of security and its period of holding. When an investor receives equity shares of a company on its IPO listing, there is no tax applicability. However, when the investor sells these equity shares, capital gains arise and the investor must pay tax at applicable rates on such income.

The period of holding is 12 months in the case of listed securities. Thus, If a taxpayer receives equity shares on IPO allotment and he/she sells them within 12 months, it is a Short Term Capital Gain. Further, if he/she sells them after 12 months, it is a Long Term Capital Gain.

Capital Gain = Sale Price – Issue Price

The tax treatment on the sale of shares received on IPO allotment is the same as the taxation of listed equity shares. Below is the tax treatment:

Capital Gain Period of Holding Tax Rate
Long Term Capital Gain Holding Period > 12 months 10% in excess of INR 1 lac under Section 112A
Short Term Capital Gain Holding Period <= 12 months 15% under Section 111A

Taxpayers holding the status of Resident as per the rules to determine the residential status can take benefit of adjusting the special rate income against the basic exemption limit to reduce taxes. Thus, if your total taxable income is less than the basic exemption limit, you can adjust your special rate income such as STCG u/s 111ALTCG u/s 112A, etc. against the shortfall in the basic exemption limit and pay tax on the remaining income only.

Example of Tax on IPO Listing

Company XYZ announces an IPO. Mr. A receives 100 shares under the IPO allotment in 2022. On the day of listing, the issue price of equity share is INR 1000 and the market price is INR 1600. Let us assume two situations:

Mr. A sells these shares on the same day

Sale of shares within 12 months is a Short Term Capital Gain.
STCG = 100 shares * (1600 – 1000) = INR 60,000
Tax Liability = 15% * 60,000 = INR 9,000

Mr. A sells these shares next year at market price of INR 1400

Sale of shares after 12 months is a Long Term Capital Gain.
LTCG = 100 shares * (1400 – 1000) = INR 40,000
Tax Liability = NIL (Exempt up to INR 1 lac)

Treatment of Loss on IPO Listing

The loss on sale of listed equity shares held for more than 12 months is a Long Term Capital Loss. The loss on sale of listed equity shares held for up to 12 months is a Short Term Capital Loss. As per the income tax rules for set off and carry forward of losses:

  • STCL can be set off against both STCG and LTCG
  • LTCL can be set off against LTCG only
  • The taxpayer can carry forward the remaining loss (STCL & LTCL) for 8 years and set off against future Capital Gains only

Reporting of IPO Listing Gains in ITR

The ITR Form under which the taxpayer needs to report income from capital gains includes ITR-2 and ITR-3. Taxpayer must report income from capital gains on the sale of IPO shares under Schedule CG of the ITR. The taxpayer must report the following details in Schedule CG:

  • Full value of consideration i.e. sales value
  • Deductions under Section 48
    • Cost of acquisition i.e. purchase value
    • Expenditure wholly and exclusively in connection with transfer i.e. transfer expenses
  • Capital Gain i.e. STCG or LTCG on shares is automatically computed

Further, in the case of Long Term Capital Gains on sale of IPO shares, the taxpayer must report the following details under Schedule 112A of the ITR:

  • ISIN i.e. International Securities Identification Number
  • Name of the share or unit
  • Number of shares
  • Sales price per share or unit
  • Cost of Acquisition
  • FMV i.e. Fair Market Value as on 31/01/2018
  • Expenditure related to transfer

FAQs

How much tax do you pay on an IPO?

When the investor receives shares under IPO allotment, there is no tax applicability. However, when the investor sells these shares, it is taxable as capital gains. LTCG on shares sold after 12 months is taxable at 10% in excess of INR 1 lac and STCG on shares sold within 12 months is taxable at 15%.

Are IPO listing gains taxable?

Yes. Gains on sale of shares that investor receives under IPO allotment are taxable as capital gains. LTCG is taxable at 10% in excess of INR 1 lac and STCG is taxable at 15%. Further, the investor can set off the LTCL against LTCG and STCL against both STCG and LTCG. He/she can carry forward the loss for 8 years and set off against future capital gains.

How can I save tax on gains from IPO Listing?

Income on the sale of shares that an investor receives under IPO allotment is taxable as capital gains.
1. STCL i.e. Short Term Capital Loss on sale of any capital asset can be adjusted against STCG and LTCG from the sale of IPO shares
2. If you’re a resident in India and other taxable incomes are less than INR 2.5 lacs, you can adjust the STCG and LTCG on the sale of IPO shares against the basic exemption limit and pay tax on the remaining amount only.
3. LTCG on sale of IPO shares can be saved either by claiming exemption from Section 54 to Section 54GB based on the nature of the capital asset 

Capital Gain Tax on Sale of Property/Land

Immovable Property or Land is considered to be a Capital Asset as per the Income Tax Act. A taxpayer who sells an immovable property or land should report such income or loss as Capital Gains it in the Income Tax Return and pay tax on it at the applicable rate. Capital Gain Tax on sale of property or land is determined on the basis of the nature of the capital gain. long term or short term. While the STCG on sale of immovable property is taxable at slab rates, the LTCG on sale of immovable property is taxable at 20% with indexation benefit under Section 112 of Income Tax Act.

Capital Gain Tax on Sale of Property / Land

Capital Gain can be of two types depending on the period of holding of the capital asset.

  1. Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG): If the taxpayer sells an immovable property or land held for more than 24 months, gain or loss on such sales is a Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG) or Long Term Capital Loss (LTCL).
  2. Short Term Capital Gain (STCG): If the taxpayer sells an immovable property or land held for up to 24 months, gain or loss on such sale is a Short Term Capital Gain (STCG) or Short Term Capital Loss (STCL).
The holding period for immovable property i.e. land, building and house property was 36 months up to FY 2016-17. However, the period of holding is reduced to 24 months FY 2017-18 onwards.
Tip
The holding period for immovable property i.e. land, building and house property was 36 months up to FY 2016-17. However, the period of holding is reduced to 24 months FY 2017-18 onwards.

Income Tax on Sale of Immovable Property

Income Tax on the sale of immovable property i.e. land, building, or house property is similar to the tax treatment of other capital assets.

Calculation of Long Term Capital Gain tax on sale of property in India

As per Section 112 of the Income Tax Act, LTCG on the sale of immovable property in India is taxable at 20% with an indexation benefit. To take the indexation benefit, the taxpayer can calculate the indexed cost of the acquisition using Cost Inflation Index i.e. CII to compute the long term capital gain. The cost of Improvement is the expense incurred by the taxpayer for making addition or improvements to the capital asset. The taxpayer can also calculate the Indexed Cost of Improvement using the CII.

  Particulars Amount
  Sale Consideration XXXX
Less Transfer Expenses (XXXX)
Less Indexed Cost of Acquisition (XXXX)
Less Indexed Cost of Improvement (XXXX)
Less Exemption u/s 54 to 54GB (XXXX)
  Long Term Capital Gain XXXX
  • Sale Consideration = In the case of immovable property, as per Section 50C of Income Tax Act, sale consideration should be the sale value of capital asset or value adopted by stamp duty valuation authority whichever is higher.
  • Transfer Expenses = expenses incurred exclusively for the sale of the capital asset.
  • Indexed Cost of Acquisition = Cost of Acquisition * (CII of year of Sale / CII of year of Purchase)
  • Indexed Cost of Improvement = Cost of Improvement * (CII of year of Sale / CII of year of Improvement)
  • Capital Gain Exemption – Taxpayer can claim capital gain exemption under Section 54 to 54GB on fulfilling the specified conditions.

Calculation of Short Term Capital Gain tax on sale of property in India

The Short Term Capital Gain on the sale of immovable property is taxable as per the slab rates. There is no indexation benefit in the case of a Short Term Capital Gain. Further, the capital gain exemption under Section 54 to 54GB is also not available. Thus, the Capital Gain is calculated on the basis of the cost of acquisition, cost of improvement, and transfer expenses.

  Particulars Amount
  Sale Consideration XXXX
Less Transfer Expenses (XXXX)
Less Cost of Acquisition (XXXX)
Less Cost of Improvement (XXXX)
  Short Term Capital Gain XXXX

Capital Gains on Sale of Property before Possession

Many times the taxpayer will sell the immovable property before receiving the possession of the same. Let’s understand the treatment of capital gains in that situation.

You have booked a property that is still under construction. So essentially you have acquired the rights for the under-construction property and not the property itself. Now before the construction completes, you want to sell the rights. Now the first question that comes to your mind is how do I calculate the capital gains for the same and what would be my tax liability?

Example

Darshil paid INR 20 Lakh on 01/01/2012 to book a house in a housing scheme. The scheme will give possession of the property on 01/01/2016. Darshil finds a better scheme and wants to sell the rights in this scheme. The taxability of the capital gains will depend on the time gap between the date of booking of the property and the date of agreement to transfer the rights in the under-construction property.

Various Situations

  1. If Darshil transfers the rights before 01/01/2015
    • Then it will result in short term capital gains since the holding period is less than 36 months.
    • Indexation benefit is not applicable
    • The capital gains will be taxable at the normal slab rate applicable to the individuals.
    • Since it will be short term capital gains, no capital gain exemption is available to save the capital gains tax on property.
  2. If Darshil transfers the rights after 01/01/2015
    • Then it will result in long term capital gains since the holding period is more than 36 months
    • Indexation benefit is applicable to the amount payable to the builder, stamp duty, and also registration fees.
    • The capital gains will be taxable at 20%
    • Since it will be long term capital gains, the exemption under Section 54F and Section 54EC will be available.
    • You can not claim the exemption under Section 54 because the exemption is for the purchase of new residential property against the sale of existing residential property. Here what you are selling is a right to acquire a residential house and not the residential house itself. Many people treat the sale of an under-construction property at par with a residential house for the purpose of claiming long term capital gain exemption which is incorrect and the taxpayer may receive a scrutiny notice.

Set Off & Carry Forward Loss on Sale of Immovable Property

  • The loss on sale of an immovable property held for more than 24 months is a Long Term Capital Loss. As per the income tax rules for set off and carry forward of losses, the taxpayer can set off Long Term Capital Loss (LTCL) against Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG) only. They can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against LTCG only.
  • The loss on sale of an immovable property held for up to 24 months is a Short Term Capital Loss. The taxpayer can set off Short Term Capital Loss (STCL) against both Short Term Capital Gain (STCG) and Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG). They can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against STCG and LTCG only.

ITR Form & Due Date for Income from Sale of Immovable Property

  • ITR Form: The taxpayer should file ITR-2 (ITR for Capital Gains Income) on Income Tax Website since income on the sale of immovable property such as land, building, or house property is Capital Gains.
  • Due Date – 31st July of the Assessment Year
    • Up to FY 2019-20 – 31st July
      31st July – for taxpayers to whom Tax Audit is not applicable
      30th September – for taxpayers to whom Tax Audit is applicable
    • FY 2020-21 Onwards
      31st July – for taxpayers to whom Tax Audit is not applicable
      31st October – for taxpayers to whom Tax Audit is applicable
  • Tax Audit: Since the income on the sale of unlisted stock is a Capital Gains Income, the applicability of tax audit under Section 44AB need not be determined.

How to save capital gains tax on sale of immovable property?

To save STCG on sale of immovable property, the taxpayer can set off Short Term Capital Loss from any other capital asset against it. Further, since STCG on sale of immovable property is taxable at slab rates, the taxpayer can claim Chapter-VIA deductions too.

To save LTCG on the sale of immovable property, the taxpayer can set off Short Term Capital Loss or Long Term Capital Loss from any other capital asset against such LTCG. Further, since LTCG on sale of immovable property is taxable at a special rate of 20%, the taxpayer cannot claim Chapter-VIA deductions against it. Taxpayer can claim following capital gain exemptions to save capital gain tax on sale of residential property:

  • Section 54F – Exemption on sale of residential house property on investment in another residential house property.
  • Section 54GB – Exemption on sale of residential house property on investment in equity shares of an eligible company.

Further, taxpayer can claim following capital gain exemptions to save capital gain tax on sale of immovable property:

  • Section 54EC – Exemption on sale of land or building on investment in NHAI/REC bonds.
  • Section 54EE – Exemption on sale of any long-term capital asset on investment in units of a specified fund.

A taxpayer can claim the exemption by reinvesting the sale proceeds into a specified capital asset to lower the capital gains and save taxes. The taxpayer must hold the new asset for the specified period as per relevant section. However, if he/she sells the asset before specified time period, they must report it as income in the relevant financial year and pay tax at applicable rate. The taxpayer has an option to open an account under Capital Gains Account Scheme and park sale proceeds in it until they invest in specified asset to claim the exemption.

Capital Gain Tax on Sale of Inherited Property

When a taxpayer receives a property as inheritance, it is not taxable for the receiver. However, when the taxpayer sells such property, it is taxable as Capital Gains. Below are the steps to calculate Capital Gains tax on sale of inherited property:

  • STCG = Sale Consideration – Transfer Expenses – Cost of Acquisition – Cost of Improvement
  • LTCG = Sale Consideration – Transfer Expenses – Indexed Cost of Acquisition – Indexed Cost of Improvement

The taxpayer must note the following for calculating Capital Gains:

  • Period of Holding to determine STCG or LTCG would be from the date of purchase by the previous owner
  • Cost of Acquisition would be the cost of the previous owner
  • Indexed Cost of Acquisition would be computed based on the year of acquisition of the previous owner

FAQs

How do you calculate long term capital gains on the sale of immovable property?

Income from sale of immovable property after 24 months of purchase is a Long Term Capital Gain taxable at 20% with benefit of indexation. In case of LTCG, the taxpayer should calculate Indexed Cost of Acquisition using Cost Inflation Index (CII) issued by income tax department to compute the LTCG.
LTCG = Sale Consideration – Expenses – Indexed Cost of Acquisition – Indexed Cost of Improvement

How can I save capital gains tax on the sale of immovable property?

You can claim capital gain exemption on investment in a specified asset and on fulfilling the specified sections. To save tax on Long Term Capital Gains from the sale of immovable property, the taxpayer can claim an exemption under Section 54, Section 54EC, Section 54EE, or Section 54GB of the Income Tax Act. These exemptions are not available for Short Term Capital Gains.

How to calculate tax on sale of inherited property?

The property received as inheritance is not taxable in the hands of the receiver at the time of inheritance. However, when the taxpayer sells the inherited property, it is taxable as capital gains. To calculate the capital gain, cost of acquisition is taken as cost to previous owner. The period of holding is calculated from the date of purchase of the previous owner.

Income Tax on Unlisted Shares in India

What are Unlisted Shares?

A Stock that is not listed on a recognized stock exchange is an unlisted stock. A trader or investor who buys and sells unlisted stocks should file ITR and pay tax on the income. Sale of Unlisted Shares is a Capital Gains Income as per the Income Tax Act. The Income Tax treatment of unlisted shares is not the same as the listed share.

Capital Gain on Sale of Unlisted Shares

Unlisted Stock is not listed on any recognised stock exchange. Thus, the Company does not pay STT i.e. Securities Transaction Tax on such shares. The period of holding is 24 months.

  1. Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG): If an investor sells an unlisted stock held for more than 24 months, gain or loss on such sales is a Capital Gain or Capital Loss.
  2. Short Term Capital Gain (STCG): If an investor sells an unlisted stock held for up to 24 months, gain or loss on such sale is a Short Term Capital Gain (STCG) or Short Term Capital Loss (STCL).

Income Tax on Unlisted Shares

Income Tax on Trading in unlisted shares is similar to the tax treatment of other capital assets. The following are the income tax rates on the sale of unlisted shares of a Domestic Company or Foreign Company.

  • LTCG – 20% with Indexation
  • STCG – taxed as per slab rates

Note: In the case of a Non-Resident, LTCG on Unlisted Stock is 10% without Indexation.

ITR Form, Due Date and Tax Audit Applicability for Unlisted Shares

  • ITR Form: Trader should file ITR 2 (ITR for Capital Gains Income) on Income Tax Website since income on the sale of unlisted stocks is a Capital Gains.
  • Due Date
    • Up to FY 2019-20
      31st July – for traders to whom Tax Audit is not applicable
      30th September – for traders to whom Tax Audit is applicable
    • FY 2020-21 Onwards
      31st July – for traders to whom Tax Audit is not applicable
      31st October – for traders to whom Tax Audit is applicable
  • Tax Audit: Since the income on the sale of unlisted stock is a Capital Gains Income, the trader need not determine the applicability of tax audit under Section 44AB of the Income Tax Act.

Carry Forward Loss on Sale of Unlisted Shares

  • The investor can set off Short Term Capital Loss against both STCG and LTCG. They can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against STCG and LTCG only.
  • The investor can set off Long Term Capital Loss against LTCG only. They can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against LTCG only.

FAQs

How do I report income from sale of unlisted shares in the Income Tax Return?

You should file ITR-2 and report income from the sale of unlisted shares of a Domestic Company or Foreign Company as Capital Gains. You should pay income tax on it as per rates below:
– Long Term Capital Gain – 20% with indexation
– Short Term Capital Gain – slab rates
The taxpayer can set off LTCL with LTCG and STCL with both STCG and LTCG. Further, the taxpayer can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years.

Can STT be paid on Unlisted Shares?

STT i.e. Securities Transaction Tax is the tax on the purchase and sale of securities listed on a recognised stock exchange in India. Thus, STT is not paid on Unlisted Shares. However, when a company offers shares to the public under IPO i.e. Initial Public Offering, such shares are later listed on the stock exchange. In such cases, STT is charged on the Unlisted Shares.

Income Tax on ETF (Exchange Traded Funds) in India

Exchange-Traded Funds were launched in India in the year 2002. There are advantages of investing in ETF over shares and mutual funds. An investor can spread the risk by investing in the equities of multiple companies instead of investing in equity shares of a single company having a higher risk. Investing in ETFs is beneficial over mutual funds due to reduced expenses and higher liquidity.

What is ETF?

ETF i.e. Exchange Traded Fund is a basket of stocks that reflects the composition of an index like BSE Sensex or CNX Nifty. Thus, it holds all the stocks in the same proportion as held by the underlying index. It is an Index Fund that is listed and traded on a stock exchange just like a stock. The trading value is based on the Net Asset Value (NAV) of the underlying asset. It is a mutual fund that the investor can buy and sell on the stock exchange, unlike the normal mutual funds that the investor can buy and sell from the AMC. Income Tax on ETFs (Exchange Traded Funds) in India is similar to the tax treatment of mutual funds.

Types of Exchange Traded Funds (ETF)

The different types of ETFs can be classified on the basis of the securities in which they invest. Following are types of ETF:

  • Equity ETF – ETFs that invest in equity shares are and other equity-related instruments.
  • Debt ETF – ETFs that invest in fixed return securities like bonds and debentures.
  • Gold ETF – ETFs that invest in physical gold assets.
  • Currency ETF – ETFs that invest in currency instruments.

Income Heads for Income from ETFs

Capital Gain on Sale of ETF (Exchange Traded Funds)

  1. Equity ETFs – Since these ETFs invest in equity-oriented instruments, the treatment is the same as equity shares.
    • Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG): Any gain arising on the sale of equity ETF held for more than 12 months is considered as Long Term Capital Gain.
    • Short Term Capital Gain (STCG): Any gain arising on the sale of equity ETF held for less than 12 months is considered as Short Term Capital Gain.
  2. Other ETFs – ETFs such as Gold ETF, International ETF, Debt ETF, etc has tax treatment similar to other capital assets.
    • Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG): Any gain arising on the sale of other ETF held for more than 36 months is considered as Long Term Capital Gain.
    • Short Term Capital Gain (STCG): Any gain arising on the sale of other ETF held for less than 36 months is considered as Short Term Capital Gain.
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Other Income from ETF (Exchange Traded Funds)

  • Interest Income
  • Dividend Income
    • In most cases, the dividend is reinvested in the scheme. However, the ETF Fund may decide to distribute dividends to the investors.
    • Up to FY 2019-20 – Exempt Income.
    • FY 2020-21 onwards – Taxable Income under the head Income From Other Sources (IFOS) at slab rates.

Income Tax on ETF (Exchange Traded Funds)

Income Tax on Trading in ETFs is similar to the tax treatment of mutual funds. Following are the income tax rates:

Type of ETF Period of Holding Long Term Capital Gain Short Term Capital Gain
Equity ETF 12 months 10% in excess of INR 1,00,000 under Section 112A 15% under Sec 111A
Other ETF 36 months 20% with Indexation Slab Rates

ITR Form, Due Date and Tax Audit Applicability for ETF Investors

  • Due Date
    • Up to FY 2019-20
      31st July – for traders to whom Tax Audit is not applicable
      30th September – for traders to whom Tax Audit is applicable
    • FY 2020-21 Onwards
      31st July – for traders to whom Tax Audit is not applicable
      31st October – for traders to whom Tax Audit is applicable

Carry Forward Loss for sale of ETFs

Gain or Loss on the sale of ETFs is a Capital Gain or Capital Loss. Here are the rules for set-off and carry forward of losses on the sale of ETFs.

  • The investor can set off Short Term Capital Loss (STCL) against both Short Term Capital Gain (STCG) and Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG). Also, they can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against STCG and LTCG only.
  • The investor can set off Long Term Capital Loss (LTCL) against Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG) only. Further, they can carry forward the remaining loss for 8 years and set off against LTCG only.
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FAQs

How do I report income from sale of ETFs in the Income Tax Return i.e. ITR?

Traders should file ITR-2 and report income from sale of ETFs as Capital Gains.
– Equity ETF – Tax on LTCG is 10% in excess of INR 1 lac and tax on STCG is 15%.
– Other ETF – Tax on LTCG is 20% with indexation and tax on STCG is as per slab rates.
The investor can set off LTCL with LTCG and STCL with both STCG and LTCG, remaining loss can be carried forward for 8 years

Is ETF a better investment option than Mutual Funds?

Yes. ETFs are better than Mutual Funds for the following reasons:
1. The investor can buy and sell an ETF directly on the stock exchange, unlike the normal mutual funds.
2. Fees and investments in ETFs are lower than Mutual Funds since there is no fund manager to make investment decisions on behalf of the investor.
3. ETFs do not have a lock-in period and investors can sell it anytime. Mutual Funds like ELSS of 3 years reduces the liquidity of investors.

In the case of Mutual Funds, it is managed by an experienced Fund Manager who makes investment decisions for the investors. No such decision-maker is available in the case of ETFs.

How are Gold ETFs different from Gold Mutual Funds?

Gold ETFs are funds that invest in physical gold assets. Thus, asset base of the ETF is 90 to 100% gold. They are traded on exchanges and offer better liquidity.
Gold funds are mutual funds that invest in gold ETFs and other related assets. They do not invest in physical gold but Gold ETFs.

What is ETF Fund?

ETF is a basket of stocks that reflects the composition of an index like BSE Sensex or CNX Nifty. It is an Index Fund that is listed and traded on a stock exchange just like a stock. Therefore, it is a mutual fund that the investor can buy and sell on the stock exchange. IT on ETFs in India is similar to the tax treatment of mutual funds.

Income Tax on Bonds & Debentures

Bonds are government securities issued by the government of India to borrow money from investors. A debenture is an interest-bearing bond or unsecured loan issued by a Company. If you have invested in bonds or debentures, you need to file your ITR and pay tax on the income. Sale of Bonds and Debentures is considered to be a Capital Gains Income. As per the Income Tax Act, both Bonds and Debentures are considered as Securities.

Types of Bonds in India include government bonds, taxable and tax-free bonds, sovereign gold bonds, capital gains bonds by NHAI & REC, IRFC tax-free bonds, etc. Types of Debentures in India include market linked debentures, non-convertible and convertible debentures, secured and unsecured debentures, redeemable and irredeemable debentures, registered and bearer debentures. SEBI (Securities Exchange Board of India) has prescribed guidelines for public issue of debentures under ICDR Regulations.

Income Heads for Income from Bonds & Debentures

Capital Gains on Sale of Bonds & Debentures

Period of Holding means the time period for which the assessee held the capital asset. The period of holding is counted from the date of acquisition (purchase) of an asset to the date of transfer (sale) of assets.

The period of holding is used to determine the nature of income on the sale of the capital asset i.e. Long Term Capital Gain or Short Term Capital Gain. Eg: If the assessee sells listed bonds within 12 months from the date of purchase, it is considered as a Short Term Capital Gain (STCG).

Type of Asset Period of Holding Capital Gains
Listed Bonds & Debentures Less than 12 months Short Term Capital Gains
Listed Bonds & Debentures More than 12 months Long Term Capital Gains
Unlisted Bonds & Debentures Less than 36 months Short Term Capital Gains
Unlisted Bonds & Debentures More than 36 months Long Term Capital Gains

IFOS Income from Bonds & Debentures

Interest Income from Bonds and Debentures is taxable under the head ‘Income from Other Sources‘ i.e. IFOS. The Interest Income is taxed at slab rates. If the assessee has incurred an expense (like commission or fees or remuneration etc) to realize such Interest, it can be claimed as a deduction from the Interest Income.

Interest Income from Tax-free bonds is fully exempt. Tax-free bonds are the bonds issued by public undertakings like National Highway Authority of India, Rural Electrification Corporation, NTPC Limited and Indian Railways, Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency, Housing and Urban Development Corporation, Power Finance Corporation and Rural Electrification Limited.

Income Tax on Bonds & Debentures

Income Tax on Trading in Bonds & Debentures is similar to the tax treatment of other capital assets. Following are the income tax rates:

Income Tax on Sale of Bonds & Debentures

Type of Asset Capital Gains Tax Rate
Listed Bonds & Debentures Short Term Capital Gains Slab Rate
Listed Bonds & Debentures Long Term Capital Gains 10% without Indexation under Section 112
Unlisted Bonds & Debentures Short Term Capital Gains Slab Rate
Unlisted Bonds & Debentures Long Term Capital Gains 20% without Indexation under Section 112

Note: Assessee cannot take benefit of indexation for the Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG) on the sale of Bonds or Debentures. However, the indexation benefit is available on Capital Indexed Bonds (issued by the Government) and Sovereign Gold Bonds (issued by the RBI under the Sovereign Gold Bond Scheme, 2015).

Income Tax on Other Income from Bonds & Debentures

Interest Income from Bonds & Debentures is taxed as per slab rates. Usually, the interest on bonds is taxable income. However, in the case of tax-free bonds, the interest income is exempt from tax.

An investor who invests in tax-free bonds should calculate the pre-tax yield before making the investment decision. To calculate the pre-tax yield, use this formula – ROI / (100-TR) * 100. (TR means Taxable Rate)

Example

Tax-Free Bonds has an interest rate of 5%. Let us assume that the investor falls in tax slab of 30%. Whether he/she invest in the tax-free bond?

Effective Tax Rate – 30% + 4% Cess = 31.2%
Calculate the pre-tax yield = 5% / (1-31.2%) = 7.16%

Thus, an investor who pays 31.2% tax, making an investment in a taxable bond with 7.16% interest is the same as investing in a tax-free bond with 5% interest.

Capital Gains Exemption under Section 54EC

An assessee who has sold Long Term Capital Asset like land or building or both can claim exemption by investing in NHAI or REC Bonds. The amount of exemption will be lower of:

  1. Cost of NHAI or REC Bonds
  2. Capital Gain on sale of land or building or both

The taxpayer can claim the capital gain exemption under Section 54EC of the Income Tax Act to reduce the tax liability.

ITR Form, Due Date and Tax Audit for Investors of Bonds & Debentures

  • ITR Form: Trader should file ITR-2 (ITR for Capital Gains Income) on Income Tax Website if income is treated as Capital Gains.
  • Due Date
    • Up to FY 2019-20
      31st July – for traders to whom Tax Audit is not applicable
      30th September – for traders to whom Tax Audit is applicable
    • FY 2020-21 Onwards
      31st July – for traders to whom Tax Audit is not applicable
      31st October – for traders to whom Tax Audit is applicable
  • Tax Audit: Since the income is treated as Capital Gains, the applicability of tax audit under Section 44AB need not be determined.

Carry Forward Loss from Sale of Bonds & Debentures

  • Short Term Capital Loss (STCL) can be set off against both Short Term Capital Gain (STCG) and Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG). The remaining loss can be carried forward for 8 years and set off against STCG and LTCG only.
  • Long Term Capital Loss (LTCL) can be set off against Long Term Capital Gain (LTCG) only. The remaining loss can be carried forward for 8 years and set off against LTCG only.

Example for capital gains on sale of bonds & debentures

For example, Mr. Rahul is a salaried individual and has invested in listed bonds and debentures in FY 2019-20. His total salary income for a year is INR 8,70,000. And has Short Term Capital Loss of Rs. 30000 and Long Term Capital Gain of INR 1,50,000.

Now in the above example, Rahul needs to file ITR-2 for FY 2019-20. And his total income and tax liability will be as follows:

Particulars Amount Amount
Salary Income   870000
Capital Gains    
Short Term Capital Loss 30000  
Long Term Capital Gain 150000  
Total Capital Gains after set-off of losses
(taxed @10% without indexation)
  120000
Total Taxable Income   990000
Tax at slab rate 86500  
Tax at special rate 12000  
Total Income Tax   98500
Health & Education Cess @4%   3940
Total Tax Liability   102440
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FAQs

How do I report income from sale of Bonds and Debentures in the Income Tax Return?

The investor should file ITR-2 and report income from the sale of Bonds and Debentures as Capital Gains.
– Listed Bonds & Debentures – Tax on LTCG is 10% without indexation and tax on STCG is as per slab rates.
– Unlisted Bonds & Debentures – Tax on LTCG is 20% without indexation and tax on STCG is as per slab rates.
The trader can set off LTCL with LTCG and STCL with both STCG and LTCG. The remaining loss can be carried forward for 8 years.

What is Income Tax on Capital Indexed Bonds issued by government and Sovereign Gold Bonds issued by RBI?

Tax on Interest on SGB Bond
It is taxable at slab rates under the head IFOS (Income from Other Sources). TDS on Interest is not applicable since they are government securities.

Tax Treatment on Sale or Redemption
A. Individual Investor
Capital Gain on Redemption of SG Bond by an individual investor is exempt from tax since the definition of transfer as per Section 47 of the Income Tax Act excludes such redemption.
If the individual investor transfers the SG Bond by selling it on the stock exchange, it is taxable as LTCG at the rate of 20% with indexation benefit.

B. Other Investors – The redemption or transfer of SG Bond in case of investors other than individuals is taxed at slab rates if STCG and at 20% with indexation benefit if LTCG.

Compliance portal: Tax liability from Sale of Immovable property

The capital gain arising from the sale of immovable property of a capital asset is subjected to tax. Capital Gain tax u/s 45 of the Income Tax Act is to be levied on the sale. However, Capital gains are of two types i.e long term and short term. The tax liability will differ depending upon the type of capital gain.

Taxpayers who receive an SMS or any communication via call or email from ITD are likely to face some verification issues in their ITRs. Taxpayers can receive the SMS for three reasons:

  1. Not filed ITR or The ITR is not filed in the given assessment year and has potential tax liability pending.
  2. Details provided by taxpayers and Information received to the ITD don’t match for that particular assessment year.
  3. Significant transactions get reported to the Income Tax department during a financial year which is considered abnormal or out of line with the profile of the taxpayer.

Taxpayers who have received any such verification issue needs to submit a response on those issues raised. The response has to be submitted online by logging into the compliance portal.

Verification issue in the computation of tax liability from Sale of Immovable Property

Code Description Response
A1 Total receipts as per taxpayer pertaining to the above information Amount + Remarks
A2 Value adopted or assessed for the purpose of payment of Stamp Duty Amount + Remarks
A3 The value is taken for computation of capital gains Amount + Remarks
A4 Less: Amount relating to another year/PAN  PAN year-wise list + Remarks
A5 Less: Amount covered in other information Amount + Remarks
A6 Less: Exemption/Deduction/Expenditure/ Set off of Loss Exemption/Deduction wise list + Remarks
A7 Income/Gains/Loss (A1-A2-A3-A4) Amount + Remarks

A1- Total receipts as per the taxpayer pertaining to the above information.

The gross value of the receivables/received payments against the transfer of the property is to be mentioned.

A2- Value adopted or assessed for the purpose of payment of stamp duty

The amount of stamp duty paid or payable is to be mentioned here. If there is no stamp duty value then the field should be left blank. As per section 50C or 43CA, if the sale amount is lower than the value taken for payment of stamp duty is to be considered for computing income.

A3- Value taken for computation of Capital Gains.

The value that has been considered for the computation of income is to be mentioned. If value taken for payment of stamp duty is higher than the sale amount and it is claimed that the former value exceeds the fair market value, then appropriate remarks are to be stated under the remarks section.

A4- Amount relating to another year/PAN.

If part of the income/receipts relates to someone else’s PAN or is considered for some other year then the List of details of such income is to be mentioned as per the table below:

A5- Amount repeatedly covered:

 If any amount is mistakenly covered twice then it should be mentioned under the Remarks section of the previous table. This will nullify the repeated Income/Gains/Loss covered.

A6- Exemption/Deduction/Expenditure/Set off of loss:

This section has to include a list of all the available allowances which are exempt. The taxpayer needs to select the correct category from the drop-down list as under:

  • Agricultural Land outside specified limits
  • Capital Gains:
    • Cost of Acquisition u/s 48
    • Cost of Improvement u/s 48
    • Expenditure incurred wholly and exclusively in connection with transfer u/s 48
    • Deductions from Capital Gains u/s 54/54B/54D/54EC/54EE/54F/54G/54GA/54GB
  • Set off of Loss
  • Others

The details are to be submitted as per the table mentioned below:

A7- Income/Gain/Loss:

This section includes the self-computation of income from house property chargeable to tax A5=(A1-(A2+A3+A4)). If your income computation exceeds the minimum of 2.5 lakh then you should file your ITR.

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FAQs

Is it necessary to login to Compliance Portal? What happens if I don’t log in?

Yes, it is advisable to log in to the compliance portal. If a taxpayer doesn’t log in he/she will not be able to respond to the issues raised.

What is an additional query request?

Upon examining the online response submitted by the taxpayer, ITD can raise an additional query request to seek further information/clarification from the taxpayer. The taxpayer needs to respond to the additional query request as well.

How will the taxpayer come to know about pending e-verification?

If there are any e-Verification issues it will be pushed to the compliance portal for e-verification, Email and SMS will be sent to the taxpayer informing about the issue raised. Taxpayers then need to respond to those issues raised.